Hatred magic card suicide black – The hater in you

They are not better than you. You are not better than them. This week is about YOU being better than last week.

We compete directly with one another in specific worlds: competitions like sports, job promotions and business. BUT, those things are insignificant in the big picture. I want you to take notice of the big picture.

I have this character flaw I’ll share with you.

One thing that I will occasionally do is I will tell myself how much better I am than another person. It’s a way to make myself feel good. In a way, it builds my confidence to put others down.

I’m better than this person because of {fill in the blank}.

It seems harmless, but this pathway of thought can often turn into resentment, jealousy and distrust. Not just negative emotions, but STRONG negative emotions. My argument for this is telling myself that I have a good bullshit meter. Instead of letting my emotions direct my thoughts, I decided to think for myself.

Somewhere in the middle of my thoughts, I asked myself a question: “Why do i feel this way?” It could’ve been a video, movie, TV show, article, etc. “Am I hating?” “Is this what it means to be a hater?

 

Let’s do a simple thought experiment:

I’m going to sound off a few names and I want you to take a mental note of either positive, neutral or negative.

 

Mike Chang
Six Pack Shortcuts

Positive/Neutral/Negative
Jason Blaha
Juggernaut Fitness TV

Positive/Neutral/Negative
Freelee The Banana Girl
Positive/Neutral/Negative
Jonnie Candito
Positive/Neutral/Negative
Mike O’ Hearn
Positive/Neutral/Negative
Hillary Clinton
Positive/Neutral/Negative
Justin Bieber
Positive/Neutral/Negative
Hitler
Positive/Neutral/Negative
Peyton Manning
Positive/Neutral/Negative
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Positive/Neutral/Negative

 

Of the 10 answers given, how many of them were neutral? I’m curious. Just comment a number. Of the names listed, Hitler is certainly 99.99% negative, I’m pretty sure it’s 100% on my channel.

 

Have you ever asked yourself why you like or dislike these people? What about hate? Hate is such a strong emotion, to spend your energy hating a person is intoxicating.

 

In my favorite card game, Magic the Gathering, there’s a card called Hatred.

Magic is basically like dungeons and dragons but on cards. You represent a wizard with spells trying to bring your opponent’s life total to zero by using creatures and spells. Each player starts with 20 life.

The card Hatred requires you to pay life to essentially do damage. So if you pay 19 life, you can do 19 damage. So if you can manage to get your opponent’s life total below yours, you can end the game with this one card. But, to use the card hatred, you have to sacrifice almost your entire being.

The analogy of the card game to life is so fitting because of the power of hatred – it’s basically the dark side of the force.

Negative emotions tell more about us than anything else. It’s not necessarily a character flaw, it’s simply a characteristic of ourselves that’s worth understanding. When dislike turns to hate, our limbic system (also known as the lizard brain) gets aroused – this is where fight or flight feelings come from.

 

When it comes to actions, EVERYONE responds differently. But, there is one thing that is certain – there is a part of you that feels like it’s in danger – there’s a threat close by.

Adrenaline starts to flow – and if you’re in a professional setting, it might be difficult to find an outlet. Because rarely are we really in any life or death circumstance day to day.

But, what if you could channel that emotion into a PR deadlift, squat or bench press? This is how seemingly heavy weights, like 90% + feel light on a particular set.

 

What if you could take the anger towards a drunk driver that caused the death of a loved one?

Candace Lightner lost her little 13 year old girl to a drunk driver. She founded the organization – Mothers Against Drunk Driving.

 

There are countless stories of people where horrible things have happened to them and their family but they managed to turn it into something that changes the world – positively impacting the lives of others.

 

So, the message today is to not be a troll – at least not the bad kind. Seek first to understand, gather your own information then form your opinion. If someone pisses you off, use that emotion to do something – create something positive for yourself and others.

 

 

One thought on “Hatred magic card suicide black – The hater in you”

  1. I came to this article via Odesk.

    You make some good points. I share the “character flaw” in which I occasionally enjoy feelings of superiority and I agree that when these are experienced as strongly reinforcing thoughts that are dwelt on then they seem to arise from an underlying insecurity. However I do feel it’s worth noting that thoughts which amount to a fleeting recognition that someone else is less proficient, capable or even intelligent than oneself, which are not dwelt on or enjoyed but possibly associated with a mild dissatisfaction with the world that this should be the case, are quite valid and do not indicate any form of insecurity.

    Your list didn’t provoke any strong emotional responses from me but that’s possibly because I am only familiar with Hillary, Justin, Hitler and Arnold; however I also think that it’s a rather big jump that you are making in going from negative emotional responses to people that may arise from feelings of insecurity and low self-esteem to hatred. It’s likely that one of us is atypical in that strong feelings of animosity play an unusually significant / insignificant role in your / my life but I would want to be more certain about this before making generalizations regarding the degree to which this is a significant factor in the social psychological environment.

    Finally, I think your list of things that warrant the depletion of our reserves of hatred is far too vague and open to abuse. Do we really want to justify hating things that pose a threat to our livelihood? This could easily be used as an excuse for holding a very negative attitude towards somebody at work who we felt represented a threat to our career goals.

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